This Is How The New Generation Of Digital CMOs Thinks About Marketing Measurement

In this episode of Marketing is Broken, we explore the trend back towards TV and the advances in marketing measurement that have led digitally-savvy CMOs like Monster.com’s Jonathan Beamer to reinvest in a channel than many think is dead or dying.
09/13/2018

This just in from Ad Age: TV still works.

In an interview with the still-somewhat fresh Monster.com CMO Jonathan Beamer, he says, “We're back on TV since April 2018 which I'm proud of because we should be.”

The new marketing leader of one of the Internet’s original job sites went on to admit that he had been anti-TV for a large portion of his career.

Now he says, “I can dispassionately look at the data at Monster and say this is absolutely where we need to be.”

You’re probably thinking to yourself: “How did Monster.com and television advertising make the marketing news in 2018? Hey Josh…  1999 called and wants their story back.”

But it is news and it brings us to tonight’s topic: how marketers should think about measurement.

"I can dispassionately look at the data at Monster and say this [TV] absolutely where we need to be."

Jonathan Beamer  -  CMO, Monster.com

Now, I can relate to being anti-TV. It was so irritating when I was a marketing spring chicken to see all of my digital projects go tragically underfunded while my TV colleagues were living large and spending insane amounts of money on brand advertising.

They got gift boxes from their advertising agencies that cost more than my entire budget.

All of it just seemed so decadent and wasteful.

But over time a few things have happened:

First, TV has gotten more measurable as it has gotten more digital.

Second, marketers are getting better at using multiple marketing channels together to create more consistent brand experiences for consumers, which leads to better results.

And finally and perhaps most importantly, we’re starting to mature a lot in how we measure the results from our combined marketing and branding efforts. Not just at a tactical level, but across all channels, campaigns, and experiences.

It used to be that digital efforts were measured solely by web-based tools like Google Analytics and TV was measured by Nielsen ratings and the two never mixed.

But then we started to blur the lines.

Nielsen started measuring brands online when they bought Vizu in 2012.

Google started measuring TV commercials this year when they rolled out Brand Lift.

Today, we have media mix and multi-click attribution models that show the effects of all channels working together. We have more data than we can shake a stick at to show us how TV and digital can play well together.

And we don’t just measure those effects so we can have the data.

We measure so we can better understand the needs of our customers.

And that’s how you can help fix marketing.

How To Think About Measurement Like A Marketing Leader

When you think about how to measure your marketing efforts, always ask yourself two questions.

What did the customer do as a result of seeing my marketing? And Why?

The what is the easy part because things like sessions, conversion rates, and cost per acquisition are all metrics we can calculate in our sleep. State your business objectives. Identify key performance indicators to support them. Tag your website. And Robert’s your mother’s brother… you’ve got yourself the “what happened.”

But the why is a little trickier to measure and where the real potential value for brand growth lies.

That’s why Monster.com’s CMO looks at brand measurement more like a conversation with consumers than an exercise in bookkeeping:

We have ongoing panels of ... audiences where we can ask a question, any question overnight and get answers. I've made sure that we're constantly looking at brand tracking results and that we have a steady stream of data coming from real customers and real candidates on how we're perceived in the marketplace.

Jonathan Beamer  -  CMO, Monster.com

When you get to this level of understanding your customers’ needs, you’re playing a an entirely different level. Channels become irrelevant. Specific reports lose their appeal.

It’s less about how you can drive 10% more traffic to your website and it becomes more about spotting the small handful of opportunities for your brand to become the market leader. And then going after those opportunities with as many channels as you can, whether it’s digital, TV, or a even a pigeon.

And that’s how you can fix marketing.

Author: Josh Braaten

CEO - Brandish Insights

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